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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17-22

Relationship between gender and in-hospital morbidity and mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in an iranian population


1 Department of Cardiac Anesthesiology, Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
2 Cardiovascular Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IR Iran
3 Heart Valve Disease Research Center, Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran

Correspondence Address:
Rasoul Azarfarin
Cardiovascular Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Daneshgah St, Tabriz
IR Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.5812/cardiovascmed.4543

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Background: Many previous studies have investigated the influence of gender on coronary artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG) outcomes. Despite the great volume of reports on this issue, it is still not clear whether it is the gender of the patient or pre-existing comorbid conditions that is the best predictor for the different outcomes seen between men and women. Multiple studies have shown that women are at higher risk of postoperative complications than men, particularly in the perioperative period. Objectives: The goal of this study was to determine whether sex differences exist in preoperative variables between men and women, and to evaluate the effect of gender on short-term mortality and morbidity after CABG in an Iranian population. Patients and Methods: Data were collected prospectively from 690 consecutive patients (495 men and 195 women) who underwent isolated CABG. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables, major complications and death were compared between the male and female patients until hospital discharge using multivariate analysis. Results: Women were older (P = 0.020), had more diabetes (P = 0.0001), more obesity (P = 0.010), a higher New York Heart Association functional class (P = 0.030), and there was less use of arterial grafts (P = 0.016). Men had more tobacco smokers (P = 0.0001) and lower preoperative ejection fractions (EF) (P = 0.030). After surgery, women had a higher incidence of respiratory complications (P = 0.003), higher creatine kinase (CK) – MB levels (P = 0.0001), and higher inotropic support requirements (P = 0.030). They also had a higher incidence of decreased postoperative EF versus preoperative values (P = 0.020). The length of ICU stay, incidence of return to ICU and postoperative death, were similar between men and women. Nevertheless, after adjusting for age and diabetes, female gender was still independently associated with higher morbidity in patients over 50 years of age. Conclusions: Women had more risk factors, comorbidities, and postoperative complications. Women older than 50 years of age were at a higher risk of postoperative complications than men. This difference decreased with younger age. In-hospital mortality rates were not influenced by sex, as there was no difference found between the two groups (2.5% women vs. 2.2% men; P > 0.05).


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